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A Biologically Inspired Cmos Image Sensor

RRP $546.99

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Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays. The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications.

The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel binarization in real time. The binary output of the pixel tries to replicate the flickering effect of the insect's eye to detect smallest possible motion based on the change in state. An inbuilt counter counts the changes in states for each row to estimate the direction of the motion. The chip consists of an array of 128x128 pixels, it occupies an area of 5 x 4 mm2 and it has been designed and fabricated in an 180nm CMOS CIS process from UMC.


Hexagonal Image Processing 2005

RRP $42.95

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The sampling lattice used to digitize continuous image data is a signi?cant determinant of the quality of the resulting digital image, and therefore, of the e?cacy of its processing. The nature of sampling lattices is intimately tied to the tessellations of the underlying continuous image plane. To allow uniform sampling of arbitrary size images, the lattice needs to correspond to a regular - spatially repeatable - tessellation. Although drawings and paintings from many ancient civilisations made ample use of regular triangular, square and hexagonal tessellations, and Euler later proved that these three are indeed the only three regular planar tessellations possible, sampling along only the square lattice has found use in forming digital images. The reasons for these are varied, including extensibility to higher dimensions, but the literature on the rami?cations of this commitment to the square lattice for the dominant case of planar data is relatively limited. There seems to be neither a book nor a survey paper on the subject of alternatives. This book on hexagonal image processing is therefore quite appropriate. Lee Middleton and Jayanthi Sivaswamy well motivate the need for a c- certedstudyofhexagonallatticeandimageprocessingintermsoftheirknown uses in biological systems, as well as computational and other theoretical and practicaladvantagesthataccruefromthisapproach. Theypresentthestateof the art of hexagonal image processing and a comparative study of processing images sampled using hexagonal and square grids.


Digital Image Forensics

RRP $574.99

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Photographic imagery has come a long way from the pinhole cameras of the nineteenth century. Digital imagery, and its applications, develops in tandem with contemporary society's sophisticated literacy of this subtle medium. This book examines the ways in which digital images have become ever more ubiquitous as legal and medical evidence, just as they have become our primary source of news and have replaced paper-based financial documentation. Crucially, the contributions also analyze the very profound problems which have arisen alongside the digital image, issues of veracity and progeny that demand systematic and detailed response: It looks real, but is it? What camera captured it? Has it been doctored or subtly altered? Attempting to provide answers to these slippery issues, the book covers how digital images are created, processed and stored before moving on to set out the latest techniques for forensically examining images, and finally addressing practical issues such as courtroom admissibility. In an environment where even novice users can alter digital media, this authoritative publication will do much so stabilize public trust in these real, yet vastly flexible, images of the world around us.


Building Digital Libraries

RRP $244.99

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Librarians embarking on the challenge of building a digital collection have their work cut out for them - and here is the book to help launch and complete the mission! Easy to understand, this guide demonstrates how resources are created, distributed, and accessed - and how librarians can keep up with the latest technologies for successfully completing these tasks. Chapters walk you step-by-step through all of the stages. This book offers detailed advice for: planning for and assessing the purpose of your digital repository; acquiring, processing, classifying and describing digital content; storing documents; choosing a platform; specific technologies useful to digital repositories (XML, SOAP, and more); sharing data; federated searching of repositories; understanding information-access issues; analyzing repository use; and, migrating to new platforms and accommodating new types of data. Librarians looking for a timely, comprehensive guide to creating a digital collection will find this book an invaluable resource.


A Biologically Inspired Cmos Image Sensor

RRP $546.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays. The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications.

The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel binarization in real time. The binary output of the pixel tries to replicate the flickering effect of the insect's eye to detect smallest possible motion based on the change in state. An inbuilt counter counts the changes in states for each row to estimate the direction of the motion. The chip consists of an array of 128x128 pixels, it occupies an area of 5 x 4 mm2 and it has been designed and fabricated in an 180nm CMOS CIS process from UMC.



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